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Britain and France Respond to the American Civil War.

Prior to the Civil War in this country, railroads were a new and relatively untried invention. However, during the rebellion, railroads came of age. They became both strategic resources, as well as a military targets, precisely because they were strategic resources. During the war, soldiers, material and food were routinely transported by rail along with civilians and the raw material.

South Korea on Monday halted the propaganda broadcasts it blares across the border with North Korea, aiming to set a positive tone ahead of the first summit in a decade between their leaders as.

IRONCLADS: THE IRONMONGERS OF THE SEA - Ironclads.

The Northern ironclad employed a different design—it was essentially an iron-covered gun turret sitting on a long raft. And when commissioned in February 1862 some of the mechanical features had yet to be worked out. Yet there was no time to fine-tune. Once Northern intelligence reported that the South’s ironclad was ready, the North’s answer—the USS Monitor—set off for Virginia.The Monitor Upon hearing about the South's new ironclad ship, the North hurried to build their own. With the help of inventor John Ericsson, the north quickly built the Monitor.The Monitor was completely protected with iron armor. It only had two cannons, but these cannons were on a revolving turret, allowing them to be aimed directly at an enemy ship.Directed by Lew Ayres. With James Dunn, Mae Clarke, David Manners, Charlotte Henry. Best friends Kenneth Reynolds and Raymond Jordan are U.S. Navy officers, and Kenneth is engaged to Raymond's sister. But the eruption of the Civil War divides them, as Raymond stands by his native Virginia while Kenneth remains on duty as a Northern officer.


After a futile effort to lighten the ship enough to allow her to move up the James River, on 11 May the South's formidible ironclad was destroyed by her crew off Craney Island, some six miles from where she had electrified the World through her battles of 8 and 9 March. CSS Virginia's wreck was largely removed between 1866 and 1876.Successful river operations demanded high-tech ironclad and steam-powered fleets and led to the development of naval strategies that are still used by the American military. In terms of the number of sailors involved and the miles of river contested, the scale of the Civil War on “brown water” exceeds all other American wars, with Vietnam second.

The USS Tecumseh, a single turret ironclad with two 15-inch heavy naval guns, was the first to chance entrance and sank within minutes after hitting one of the torpedoes. Perishing in the explosion were 93 men out of a crew of 114. In the best tradition of the sea, Captain Tunis A.M. Craven went down with his ship after giving up his chance to escape to another crew member.

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Welles and the navy next turned their attention to New Orleans, the South’s largest city, port, and gateway to the Mississippi River. Guarded 70 miles downriver from the city by two strengthened forts, Jackson and St. Philip, New Orleans was difficult to assault from the sea or blockade. Adding to its defense was the first operational river ironclad, the lightly armored, turtle-shaped CSS.

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What a pleasure it is when one discovers a writer who combines ironclad storytelling techniques with the linguistic finesse of more literary novelists. William Shaw is surely such a writer, a man whose command of narrative grips the reader by the throat from page one, and never lets go - but also allows every word to register with exactly the right amount of resonance.

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In 1863-65, Commander Brown was captain of the ironclad CSS Charleston, which operated in defense of Charleston, South Carolina. After the end of the Civil War, he farmed in Mississippi and later moved to Texas. Commander Isaac Newton Brown died at Corsicana, Texas, on 1 September 1889.

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Building ironclads consumed most of the South’s naval effort. Mallory began studying the possibility of their construction in Southern yards in early June 1861. The first one arose from the burnt-out hulk of the USS Merrimack at Hampton Roads. The Confederacy had to do it this way because the South lacked the ability to build the ship it wanted from scratch. Mallory planned to use this new.

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The CSS Albemarle was one of the South’s most successful ironclads during the war. The ship was built in North Carolina between 1863 and 1864. The chief constructor on the project was a man named Gilbert Elliot who was only nineteen years old. After the CSS Albemarle was commissioned, she immediately went into combat in April of 1864. From April until the time of her sinking in October, CSS.

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This nautical fiction tells the story of an officer aboard the last Confederate ironclad ship of war, the C.S.S. Stonewall, in 1865. The Stonewall, a powerful modern armored ram, threatened for a few months at the end of America's Civil War to break the Federal blockade of the Confederacy and thus change the course of history. This is a fiction, but it includes real ships, officers, and.

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During the American Civil War, sturdier ships were needed to attack and defend ports, cities, and fortresses. The Confederate States of America needed to defend itself from the United States Union, while the Union had a plan called the Anaconda Plan, in which they cut off supplies by blockading the South's ports and cities. New technologies enabled them to carry or be made of heavy iron armor.

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Focusing on the South's ironclads, commerce raiders, torpedoes, and mines, this study breaks new ground by giving the Confederate Navy proper credit for its strategic successes, international range, and technical advances. For example, the author disproves the widely held notion that the South's ironclads were a failure, built only to break the Union blockade and relegated to other duties.

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The ironclad ram CSS Albemarle was one of the South’s most successful ironclads. Built in a cornfield near Scotland Neck, North Carolina, the ironclad moved down the Roanoke River to attack the Union warships defending the river port town of Plymouth, North Carolina. On April 19, 1864, Albemarle sank USS Southfield and damaged USS Miami. This.

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